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Flower Arrangements

Giving Potted Plants As Gifts

potted

Giving potted plants as gifts is growing in popularity, and with good reason. Potted plants are rarely more expensive than cut flowers, but they last much longer. With the right kind of care, they can even last for years. That said, not all potted plants are good gift ideas and, unfortunately, not all potted plant gifts can be persuaded to bloom again.

Ideas for Potted Plant Gifts
When you’re looking to give flowering plants as gifts, you want to choose something that’s easy to care for. Unless you know your recipient to be an avid gardener who likes a challenge, you should opt for something that’s very low maintenance.

Remember, you want to give a decoration, not a responsibility. There are a few especially popular potted plant gifts that are known for their ease of care.

african-violets

African violets are an excellent choice for low light, and they’ll keep flowering almost year round.

clivia
Clivia is a very hardy houseplant that blooms red and orange around Christmas and can last for years and years with little care.

Small herbs, like lavender and rosemary, are the whole package: easy to care for, fragrant, and useful.

gift-in-pots

Potted Plants vs. Cut Flowers
If you’ve been given flowering plants as gifts, you may be at a loss as to what to do with them. Cut flowers, of course, will only last so long and then must be tossed. Most potted plants, however, can be replanted in the garden or left to grow in their pots.

tulips

Unfortunately, some potted plants, like mums, are likely to last only one season.
Flowering bulb plants, like tulips and hyacinths, can be saved for years. After they’re done blooming, place the pots outdoors or in a sunny window and keep watering them. They won’t bloom again this season, but the foliage will continue to grow. Later, when the foliage withers and yellows naturally, cut it off and dig up the bulbs.

hyacinths
Dry them in a cool dark place and store them until the fall, when you can plant them in another pot or directly in your garden. They should come up naturally in the spring.

Azaleas and African violets can be kept in their pots to bloom for years. Hydrangeas, lily of the valley, and begonias can be transplanted out into the garden.

SOURCE

Exotic Flowers

Breathtaking Exotic Flowers and plants add that extra special touch to gardens, homes, and all occasions – weddings, celebrations, banquets, as well as solemn occasions. Find below the list of various exotic flowers, which we have compiled.

flower 1

Dutch amaryllis (Amaryllis/Hippeastrum – )Amaryllis flowers are bulbous flowers coming in Orange, red, rose, pink, white, bi-colored.

flower 2

Anthuriums (Anthurium species) – Anthuriums are rigid flowers with a thick and waxy feel and appearance. The anthurium flower is in fact the spathe of the plant. In the middle of the spathe is an upright organ called the spandix. The flowers actually grow on the spandix. Their colors range from whites to pinks and reds.

flower 3

Birds of Paradise (Stelitzia reginae) –The name Birds of Paradise comes from the spectacular flower shape, which resembles a birds beak and head plumage.

flower 4

Calla Lily (Zantedeschia)-  The calla lily flower spathe, is a large, flaring, trumpet-shaped bract, surrounds the spadix which is covered with tiny flowers.

flower 5

Equadorian roses-  Equadorian roses are very beautiful roses displaying in a wide range of colors.

flower 6

Gardenias (Gardenia jasminoides)–  Gardenias are waxy, white and very fragrant, seen either single or double and up to 4 inches in diameter.

 

flower 7

Lilacs – Lilac flowers are purple color, clustered, beautiful and very fragrant, which carries quite a distance.

flower 8

Lily of the valley – Lily of the valley are bell-shaped flowers that infuse the air with fragrance throughout the day.

flower 9

Miniature Calla Lily (Zantedeschia Rehmannii)– Miniature calla lilies are native to Southern and Eastern Africa.These flowers are funnel-shaped colored spathe enclosing a yellow finger-like spadix.

flower 10

Oriental Lily – The Oriental lily flowers may be borne erect, horizontal, or drooping, and can be funnel-shaped to bell-shaped. Lily flowers comes in white to yellow, pink, orange, and red colors.

Source Flower Experts.co

Japanese Flower Arrangement: Ikebana

sample vase

 

Ikebana is the art of arranging flowers. In Japanese “ike” means to arrange and “bana” ori-gens from the word “hana” meaning flower.
In Ikebana the flowers and branches are arranged so that they appear in a beautiful, simpel, and natural way.

Apart from fresh flowers and branches, wood, metal, plastic and many other things can be used.

The shape and colour of the vase is also of great importance to the final arrangement.
Ikebana came to Japan with Buddhism from India via China, around year 6oo a.d. Like in many other religions, the alters in the Japanese temples were also decorated with flowers and fruits. These offerings were the origin of Ikebana.
Many people might feel that Ikebana does not fit into a Western-style home. But on the other hand an Ikebana arrangement matches very well with a light-coloured wall, or a brick wall or any other kind of home.

bell ikebana
Ikebana is not only about two branches and three flowers in a ball. The interaction between the vase and the branches and the flowers are together creating the final harmony.

While flower arrangement for many people in the West consists of symmetrically arranging flowering plants in a vase, Japanese Ikebana (literally ‘flowers kept alive‘) is a lot more complex.

Ikebana came to Japan with Buddhism from India via China, around year 6oo a.d. Like in many other religions, the alters in the Japanese temples were also decorated with flowers and fruits. These offerings were the origin of Ikebana.
Many people might feel that Ikebana does not fit into a Western-style home. But on the other hand an Ikebana arrangement matches very well with a light-coloured wall, or a brick wall or any other kind of home.

Ikebana is not only about two branches and three flowers in a ball. The interaction between the vase and the branches and the flowers are together creating the final harmony.
While flower arrangement for many people in the West consists of symmetrically arranging flowering plants in a vase, Japanese Ikebana (literally ‘flowers kept alive’) is a lot more complex.

In the late 17th century, the growing merchant class developed a simpler style, called seika or shoka. Shoka uses only three main branches, known as ten (heaven), chi (earth) and jin (man) and is designed to show the beauty of the plant itself. Another old form of ikebana is nageire, used in the tea ceremony.

meaning
The Ohara school generally uses moribana (piled-up flowers) in a shallow, flat container. The school was started at a time when Western culture was heavily influential in Japan and the moribana style made good use of Western plants. But it was still a formal style. Influence from the artistic movements of the early 20th century led to the development of jiyuka (free-style) arrangement. Despite all the changes, ikebana was still only for the upper class.

Ikebana can be roughly divided into two styles –

  • the moribana shallow vase style and
  • the nageire tall vase style.
  • The Sogetsu school uses a series of kakei (patterns) for each style so that ven the beginner can quickly create their own arrangements.

As an example, let’s look at the moribana Basic Upright style.

The shushi are the three main branches –

  • the shin (truth) branch,
  • the soe (supporting) branch and
  • the hikae (moderating) branch.

The arrangement of these branches and the kenzan or spiked metal holder are drawn in a simple diagram, called a kakeizu.

sketch and sample vase

The kakeizu shows a frontal and overhead view of the arrangement. After examining the kakeizu, suitable branches or flowers are chosen for the shushi and trimmed if necessary. The stems are cut to correct lengths according to set formulae.
The kenzan is placed in the vase and just covered with water. The sushi are fixed to the kenzan in order and according to the kakeizu. Jushi or short supplementary stems are added to support the shushi and give depth to the arrangement. Finally, the composition is examined and any finishing touches applied.
Source: Japan’s Ikebana

 

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